The Kazblog Archives

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$1.3 million dollar judgment in Xu v. Balaski

Talya Schapiro and Clara Linegar of KazLaw Injury Lawyers have received an excellent judgment in Xu v. Balaski, 2020 BCSC 940. This is another case where the Court awarded our client damages more than triple the amount ICBC offered!

Sandy Kovacs and the Kazlaw team received a successful judgement in Anderson v. Molon

Access to justice for victims of sexual assault is a serious problem in Canada. In my experience, most victims are extremely reluctant to move forward with civil litigation for fear of being re-traumatized by the process. It is my practice to ensure my clients are as empowered as possible throughout the process, because reclaiming power – particularly in exploitation cases – is, in my view, a necessary step in the victim’s healing journey.

Chapman-Fluker v Gustavson: Successfully opposed application on jury notices

Mike Huot of KazLaw Injury Lawyers received an excellent judgment in Chapman-Fluker v Gustavson 2019 BCSC regarding a very contentious application by ICBC to extend the period for filing a jury notice. The Defendants relied on Rule 22-4 (2), which authorizes the court to extend or shorten any period of time provided for in the rules.

Why Juries?

In British Columbia, the parties to a civil case have a right to request that their case be decided by a jury of their peers. ICBC lawyers often prefer to have cases heard by a jury, believing that jurors will be biased against certain vulnerable groups: low-income earners, people with a history of mental or physical health issues, people involved in low velocity impact crashes and people who speak English as second language. ICBC’s hope is that the threat of a jury trial will force plaintiffs to settle their claims before trial for a fraction of what they have lost.

What to Do in Case of a Cycling Collision

In B.C., 670 cyclists are injured and six are killed in crashes involving motor vehicles from June to September every year. That means five B.C. cyclists injured each day in the summer. What should you do if you collide with a motor vehicle–or even another cyclist or pedestrian?

Front Page News: KazLaw Expands

Big news for KazLaw! We are pleased and excited to announce that we have a new Surrey office location! KazLaw has recently acquired Caissie and Company, a boutique personal injury firm which was built and led by Edmund Caissie, an amazing lawyer and long-time friend of our firm.

KazLaw Mountain Biking Community Award – Vote Now!

KazLaw is pleased to announce that voting is now open for the 2017 KazLaw Community Award, which sponsors a deserving rider to participate in the annual BC Bike Race. The Award is meant to recognize riders who make a difference to their cycling community in British Columbia.

Exploring the Fault Lines (of a No-Fault System)*

In 2016, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (“ICBC”) proposed a hike in insurance rates in response to increased costs and decreased earnings. As expected, this announcement aroused discussion about the merits of implementing a no-fault system in British Columbia.

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$1.3 million dollar judgment in Xu v. Balaski

Talya Schapiro and Clara Linegar of KazLaw Injury Lawyers have received an excellent judgment in Xu v. Balaski, 2020 BCSC 940. This is another case where the Court awarded our client damages more than triple the amount ICBC offered!

Sandy Kovacs and the Kazlaw team received a successful judgement in Anderson v. Molon

Access to justice for victims of sexual assault is a serious problem in Canada. In my experience, most victims are extremely reluctant to move forward with civil litigation for fear of being re-traumatized by the process. It is my practice to ensure my clients are as empowered as possible throughout the process, because reclaiming power – particularly in exploitation cases – is, in my view, a necessary step in the victim’s healing journey.

Chapman-Fluker v Gustavson: Successfully opposed application on jury notices

Mike Huot of KazLaw Injury Lawyers received an excellent judgment in Chapman-Fluker v Gustavson 2019 BCSC regarding a very contentious application by ICBC to extend the period for filing a jury notice. The Defendants relied on Rule 22-4 (2), which authorizes the court to extend or shorten any period of time provided for in the rules.

Why Juries?

In British Columbia, the parties to a civil case have a right to request that their case be decided by a jury of their peers. ICBC lawyers often prefer to have cases heard by a jury, believing that jurors will be biased against certain vulnerable groups: low-income earners, people with a history of mental or physical health issues, people involved in low velocity impact crashes and people who speak English as second language. ICBC’s hope is that the threat of a jury trial will force plaintiffs to settle their claims before trial for a fraction of what they have lost.

What to Do in Case of a Cycling Collision

In B.C., 670 cyclists are injured and six are killed in crashes involving motor vehicles from June to September every year. That means five B.C. cyclists injured each day in the summer. What should you do if you collide with a motor vehicle–or even another cyclist or pedestrian?

Front Page News: KazLaw Expands

Big news for KazLaw! We are pleased and excited to announce that we have a new Surrey office location! KazLaw has recently acquired Caissie and Company, a boutique personal injury firm which was built and led by Edmund Caissie, an amazing lawyer and long-time friend of our firm.

KazLaw Mountain Biking Community Award – Vote Now!

KazLaw is pleased to announce that voting is now open for the 2017 KazLaw Community Award, which sponsors a deserving rider to participate in the annual BC Bike Race. The Award is meant to recognize riders who make a difference to their cycling community in British Columbia.

Exploring the Fault Lines (of a No-Fault System)*

In 2016, the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (“ICBC”) proposed a hike in insurance rates in response to increased costs and decreased earnings. As expected, this announcement aroused discussion about the merits of implementing a no-fault system in British Columbia.

No more posts to show